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Sharon L. Freeman, Esq., Attorney at Law
A Board Certified Attorney Representing Injured Workers And Their Families [Se Habla Español]

4 safety violations in construction that can kill you

You have worked in the construction industry for a while, so you already know that you are in a dangerous profession. You may follow all safety procedures and use the proper equipment, but you cannot always predict an accident or prevent others from doing something that could hurt someone. You might have also witnessed your employer cutting corners and putting workers at risk.

When you know the common accident types that can harm construction workers in New Jersey and elsewhere, you can improve your chances of staying safe on the job.

 

According to the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration, four accident types in particular are responsible for most injuries and fatalities in the construction industry. These are the “fatal four.” You may encounter the following safety violations regarding these four accident types:

1. Falls

A scaffolding you are working on might not be secure or have a full walking surface. Your employer might not provide you with a safety harness when you are working at great heights.

2. Struck by object

A coworker may fail to watch out for others when driving a construction vehicle. Employers might not have given out helmets to protect you from equipment or debris falling from above.

3. Caught-in/between

Improper training or inattentive workers could result in the pinning or crushing of you or other workers with heavy machinery. A trench collapse might also trap you when the excavation walls were not safely braced or shored.

4. Electrocution

You could suffer a shock if you are working with faulty power tools or around electrical cables that have not been disconnected. You might also be at risk of electrocution if the ground is wet near energized wires or your employer did not give you the proper gear for working near electricity.

Officials believe if employers could eliminate the fatal four, they would spare 602 construction workers across the country every year.

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