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Sharon L. Freeman, Esq., Attorney at Law
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3 dangers janitorial workers face on the job

Janitors can face high rates of workplace-related injuries. According to data collected by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, there were 277.4 cases of injury/illness out of every 10,000 full-time janitors and cleaners in 2015

After sustaining an injury, a janitor should receive medical attention and bring the incident to the attention of the supervisor. There are also a range of steps injured janitors may want to take towards adequate workers' comp.

Prevention is always better for everyone, and it pays off to remain aware of the common dangers janitors face on a regular basis.

1. Slip and falls

Janitors typically put out the proper signage to inform passersby of slippery surfaces or flooring that has just been cleaned. It is paramount for janitors to be aware that they are also at great risk when walking over these surfaces. To prevent these injuries, janitors should wear shoes with rubber soles. This footwear offers more traction.

2. Toxic chemical exposure

Janitors must typically use an array of cleaning products to do their jobs. These products can contain chemicals, such as sodium hydroxide, chlorine and ammonia. Exposure to these chemicals and similar ones can lead to burns and irritations. Janitors should consult with supervisors about only using products deemed safe and good for the environment. There are plenty of items now on the market that only use natural ingredients. 

3. Repetitive motions

Janitors often perform the same tasks day in and day out. They pull, reach, bend and lift. Over time, these actions can wear down joints and ligaments, resulting in significant pain. It is paramount for janitors to take breaks often and never overexert themselves. Janitors should also maintain good posture while performing all tasks. For instance, significant back injuries can occur if someone attempts to lift something too quickly and without maintaining a wide base of support. 

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