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Sharon L. Freeman, Esq., Attorney at Law
A Board Certified Attorney Representing Injured Workers And Their Families [Se Habla Español]

The hidden side of teaching and other education jobs

Teachers and other school personnel such as paraeducators, physical therapists, nurses and lab specialists work hard. They are asked to do more than ever before and must wear many hats. The cumulative effect in the best of cases is often a job that is stressful yet fulfilling.

Yet violence can be a fact of life in even these best cases. It is not something schools really like to talk about, so a teacher or staffer who has been violently injured on the job may feel isolated. However, there is no doubt that violence is a real problem facing those who work in schools, and they deserve to be compensated and treated with dignity so they can return to work as quickly as possible if they are able to.

How educators become injured

There are many ways in which an educator can get hurt. For example, someone trying to break up a fight could end up with broken bones, fractures or concussions. When a teacher is pregnant, even a door slamming on her in the stomach area can cause significant problems. And then some attacks are purposeful. For example, a student might try to bite or choke a teacher.

Of course, in some cases, it is not violence that leads to an injury. A janitor might slip and fall, for example, or a teacher running down the hall to help with a conflict might fall. Student projects gone awry have also led to injuries and chemical burns.

What to do

Many people who work in schools are resilient and view some injuries as just part of the job. They may shrug injuries off as inconsequential or a cost of doing business and never report or discuss them in depth. However, they deserve any compensation they may be entitled to and for their injuries to not become worse or have a serious long-term effect. If you have been hurt, report the injury and visit a doctor as soon as possible.

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